The Semiconductor Shortage: Where Are We Now?

AT&T Policy Forum
October 29, 2021
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The Semiconductor Shortage: Where Are We Now?

As we head into the holiday season, global supply chain disruptions continue to create ripple effects throughout key sectors of the economy. Consumers and businesses now face the possibility that delays and shortages will extend well into 2022.

And, for sectors that depend on chips, computing, and connectivity to function, the present and anticipated shortage of semiconductors presents an urgent challenge to business continuity, integrity, and operations.

Why it matters: Semiconductors are critical building blocks that connect modern society and spur innovation, but fabrication plants – or “fabs” – around the globe have been forced to slow production or shut down altogether. Meanwhile, the thicket of geopolitical considerations that governs access to key materials for semiconductor production, such as rare earth minerals have, created an additional bottleneck.

Global semiconductor supply chain constraints have dragged on and had a profound impact on businesses across many industries.  As factories around the globe have been forced to slow production, or shut down altogether, the path to recovery is crucial and requires immediate action.

Lack of access to materials, like rare minerals, has created a bottleneck that must be addressed through international policy discussions and pending legislation. Join us for an update on Capitol Hill and administration activity to address ongoing semiconductor supply chain and ICT issues.

John Neuffer, President & CEO, Semiconductor Industry Association, delivered an opening keynote and was followed by a roundtable discussion with:

  • Sree Ramaswamy, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Policy and Strategic Planning, US Department of Commerce
  • Bruce Stokes, Non-Resident Transatlantic Fellow, The German Marshall Fund of the United States.

A panel discussion followed the roundtable, plus additional commentary from Peter Harrell (title below) and Sree Ramaswamy, including the following:

  • David Shepardson, Correspondent, Reuters (Moderator)
  • Robert Hoffman, Head of Government Affairs, Broadcom
  • Michael Petricone, Senior Vice President, Government Affairs, Consumer Technology Association (CTA)
  • Jayne Stancavage, Global Executive Director of Product & Digital Infrastructure Policy, Intel Corporation
  • Peter Harrell, Senior Director for International Economics and Competitiveness, White House National Security Council
  • Sree Ramaswamy, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Policy and Strategic Planning, US Department of Commerce